SEC History

History of the Southeast Colloquium

In 1976, a small group of journalism historians, primarily from the southeastern United States, decided to gather in Chapel Hill, N.C., to do the sorts of things academicians usually do when they meet — talk about their research, share teaching tips, debate and discuss issues and ideas, and, most likely, commiserate over low salaries, heavy teaching loads and insufficient time for writing and research.

Thus was born the Southeast Regional Colloquium. The oldest and most successful regional journalism and mass communication meeting, the Southeast Colloquium has given hundreds of graduate students their first crack at presenting their scholarly research at an academic conference. It has allowed scores of professors and students to try out ideas and theories, many of which ultimately blossomed into articles, monographs and even books. It has provided teachers a much-needed break from the daily routine of lectures, labs and paper grading, coupled with the opportunity to hear thought-provoking speakers and stimulating panel discussions. But perhaps most importantly, it has given journalism and mass communication scholars the chance to meet and interact with colleagues from other schools in an informal, collegial atmosphere, the chance to form not only professional relationships but also lasting friendships.

When members of the History Division agreed to hold the first colloquium at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill in 1976, AEJMC was just AEJ. Although the association’s name was used in conjunction with the gathering, the colloquium was a grassroots activity, planned, organized and carried out by the scholars themselves rather than by AEJ officers or staff. The organizers decided the term “colloquium,” rather than “convention” or “conference,” best described the nature of the gathering.

The colloquium’s present format was established early on. A host school plans and coordinates the event with participants charged a registration fee low enough to enable graduate students to afford to attend but high enough to enable the host school to cover all, or most, of the expenses.

Participants in the first colloquium enjoyed the experience so much that they decided to do it again the following year. The second colloquium, still primarily a gathering of History Division members, was held in 1977 at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville.

History, newspaper and law gathered at the Atlanta Biltmore Hotel in 1980 for a colloquium coordinated jointly by Harold Davis of Georgia State, Wallace Eberhard of the University of Georgia and Sam Riley of Georgia Southern.  Colleagues outside the Southeast were invited to submit papers, establishing the open-to-all policy still followed today.  Five students and 11 faculty members presented papers, and The Newspaper Fund conducted a workshop of “Teaching Reporting of the Courts.”

The Sheraton in Memphis, Tennessee, was the site of the 1981 colloquium, with Gerald Stone of Memphis State as coordinator.  A highlight of the sixth Southeast Colloquium was Joseph Costa’s talk on his camera coverage of the Bruno Hauptmann trial for the kidnapping and murder of the Lindbergh baby.  Conferees also attended Memphis’s famed Blues Alley and sampled some memorable barbequed ribs.

In 1982, the colloquium moved to the Holiday Inn in Gainesville, Florida, with Jon Rosenraad and Jean Chance of the University of Florida coordinating arrangements.  Participation continued to increase, with 18 faculty and five student paper presentations.  The keynote speaker was Roy Peter Clark of the Modern Media Institute.

Whitney Mundt of Louisiana State University hosted the 1983 meeting at the Prince Murat Hotel in Baton Rouge.  One highlight was Louisiana Governor Edwin Edwards’s participation in a panel discussion on law and ethics.  A Louisiana crawfish jamboree dinner gave local flavor to the proceedings.

In 1984, AEJ became AEJMC, and George Cullen of the Hampton Institute hosted the Southeast Colloquium at the Holiday Inn in Hampton, Virginia.  Two highlights of the event were Attorney Conrad Shumadine’s keynote address on gaining access to information and crab from the Chesapeake Bay.

The 10th annual Southeast Colloquium was hosted by Wallace Eberhard of the University of Georgia and held at the Athens Holiday Inn.  Panels included “Success in Publishing”, “Research Sources in Media History” and “The Professor and the PC.”  At this meeting, some attendees gathered to discuss forming a separate undergraduate student-oriented version of the Southeast Colloquium, which eventually became known as the Southeast Journalism Conference.

Mike Singletary of the University of Tennessee coordinated the 1986 meeting at the Knoxville Hilton, where 32 faculty and four student papers were presented.  Colloquium attendees were treated to authentic mountain music and a Southern barbeque dinner at the Museum of Appalachia.

The Marriott in Blacksburg, Virginia, was the site of the 1987 colloquium with Sam Riley of Virginia Tech acting as host.  Twenty-one faculty papers, eight student papers and two panels formed the core of the program.  A trip to Mountain Lake Hotel for dinner was one of the social events.

In 1988, the Southeast Colloquium moved back to the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa, where participants stayed at the Sheraton Capstone Inn.  David Sloan and Jim Stoval hosted the conference.  A 12-page packet containing the abstracts of the 28 papers presented at the meeting was given to each registrant.

The following year, the colloquium returned home, and Raleigh Mann of the University of North Carolina coordinated arrangements.  Participants stayed at the historic Carolina Inn adjacent to the Chapel Hill campus.  The Law Division presented a panel on lawyers in the newsroom.  A Carolina pig-pickin’ was the culinary treat, with entertainment by Mann’s own barbershop quartet.
In 1990, Perry Ashley and South Carolina welcomed attendees back to Charleston.  Hurricane Hugo, which had blown through Charleston in 1987, provided the topic for a panel on disaster coverage.  Public officials critiqued media coverage of the hurricane’s aftermath, and attendees walked through downtown Charleston to examine damage to the historic district.

Fred Felder of the University of Central Florida hosted the next colloquium at Orlando’s Harley Hotel.  Fedler arranged a panel of three Pulitzer Prize winners:  Dave Barry of the Miami Herald, Lucy Morgan of the St. Petersburg Times and Jan Healy of the Orlando Sentinel.

In 1992, the colloquium moved to Stone Mountain, Georgia, a resort near Atlanta, where Wallace Eberhard of the University of Georgia and Greg Lisby of Georgia State University coordinated arrangements.  This was the first year that paper submissions and attendance both topped 100, with 106 papers submitted and 100 people attending.  As further evidence of the colloquium’s maturity, Eberhard and Lisby published the proceedings of the meeting, including the full text of the top five papers and abstracts of 23 others.  The publication was a first for the colloquium and continues today.  Lisby served as editor of the proceedings until Ginger Carter of Georgia College took over in 1997.

The University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa hosted the 1993 Southeast Regional Colloquium when Sloan and Stovall again served as coordinators.  In 1994 it was back to Charleston for another colloquium hosted by the University of South Carolina College of Journalism and Mass Communications.  A record 143 papers were submitted, and 97 were accepted for presentation at the 1994 meeting.  USC Associate Dean Pat McNeely, colloquium coordinator, treated conferees to an assortment of Charleston cuisine and walking tours of the harbor.

The colloquium returned to the University of Florida in 1995 to celebrate its 20th birthday.  Participants visited the new wing of Weimer Hall to see Sun.ONEonline information service and other telecommunications activities.  In addition to a plenary session and panel discussions on the media and the criminal justice system and coverage of high-profile trials, more than 80 research papers were presented.  Sandra Chance coordinated the 20th annual program, and more than 60 faculty and students registered.

Virginia Tech and Washington and Lee joined forces to host the 1996 Southeast Colloquium at Virginia Tech’s newly refurbished Hotel Roanoke and Conference Center.  The annual Washington and Lee Ethics Institute took place at the same time, providing expanded programming.  Wat Hopkins, Sam Riley and Ken Rystrom of Virginia Tech, and Ham Smith and Brian Richardson of Washington & Lee organized guest speakers and panel discussions on media ethics.

The 1997 colloquium returned to the University of Tennessee in Knoxville with Dorothy Bowles as coordinator.  For the first time in 19 years, the colloquium expanded to include other divisions.  Members of AEJMC’s Communication Theory and Methodology and Magazine Divisions joined History, Law and Newspaper.  The Magazine Division held its annual midyear meeting in conjunction with the colloquium.  Another innovation was the creation of an “open division” paper competition.  A total of 168 papers were submitted to the six separate paper competitions, and 122 were accepted for presentation.  Jane Kirtley, executive director of The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, was the keynote speaker.

The 1998 colloquium was held at the Best Western Landmark Hotel in Metairie, Louisiana, outside New Orleans.  Once again the Magazine Division joined History, Law and Newspaper, but neither the CT&M nor Open divisions operated in the 1998 colloquium.  A consortium of 11 Louisiana schools hosted the colloquium and Joe Mirando of Southeastern Louisiana University served as coordinator.  A total of 143 papers were submitted, and the four divisions accepted 98.  Special session speakers addressed accreditation, restrictions on interviewing jurors and coverage of the TWA Flight 800 crash.  At the business meeting, colloquium participants voted to officials add the Magazine Division to the roster of permanent Southeast Colloquium sponsors.

Lexington, Kentucky, was the site of the 1999 Colloquium when Roy Moore of the University of Kentucky acted as coordinator.  Eastern Kentucky University, Northern Kentucky University and Murray State joined UK as hosts.  The Open Division paper competition was reinstated, and a total of 118 research papers were presented.  First Amendment attorney Bruce Sanford gave a keynote address on “Shooting the Messenger:  The Evaporation of First Amendment Protections for the Media,” and a panel of journalists, judges and lawyers discussed issues related to whether journalists have the right to disobey court orders they believe are unconstitutional.

In 2000, the Colloquium returned to its roots at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill where the organization was founded in 1975.  Peggy Blanchard coordinated the 25th annual Southeast Colloquium and Mary Alice Shaver and Ruth Walden rounded out the steering committee.  The Colloquium included Media Ethics and continued the Open Division, which was started at Kentucky in 1999.  Nearly 10 presentations were made on topics ranging from the changing definition of malice to reporters’ uses of Internet “cookies” for research and the continuing impact of media mergers on newsgathering.  The colloquium was a double celebration as participants toured Carroll Hall, North Carolina’s new state-of-the-art facility, which Dean Richard Cole said represented one of the most important developments in the school’s 75-year history.

The University of South Carolina and the state capital, Columbia, again played host to the Colloquium in 2001.  Patricia McNeeley coordinated the presentation of more than 100 papers in five divisions:  History, Law, Magazine, Newspaper and Open.  Highlights of the meeting included a distinguished panel on South Carolina “Journalists as Educators” held at USC’s impressive Carolinian Library; a panel on “Preparing the Next Generation of Journalists,” featuring an internal panel of prominent journalists and publishing executives from a half-dozen countries; a guided tour of South Carolina’s historic State House; and a well attended “open house” reception hosted by AEJMC at its nearby association headquarters office.
The Colloquium moved to Gulfport, Mississippi, on the Gulf Coast in 2002, where David Davies and the University of Southern Mississippi hosted.  The program kicked off with an outside reception on the beautiful Oasis Veranda of the Grand Oasis Hotel.  A plenary panel featured veteran journalists, all members of the Mississippi Press Association Hall of Fame, who recalled coverage of the civil rights movement, and that panel was followed by a lunchtime address by the Sun Herald’s executive editor.  Colloquium participants presented 85 papers in the History, Law, Magazine, Newspaper and Open divisions.

In 2003, Rick Peltz and the Schools of Law and Mass Communication at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock Arkansas hosted the 28th annual conference.  The program included an address by Skip Rutherford, President, of the William J. Clinton Presidential Foundation and a tour of the Clinton Presidential Library.

Tampa, Florida, was the site of the 2004 Colloquium and Marie Curkan-Flanagan of the University of South Florida acted as coordinator.  Faculty and staff in the School of Mass Communications were the hosts.  For the first time in its 29-year history the Southeast Colloquium included the RTVJ Division of the AEJMC.  At the business meeting, colloquium participants voted to officially add RTVJ to the permanent roster of Southeast Colloquium Divisions.  Gil Thelen, publisher of the Tampa Tribune delivered the keynote address and the Tampa Tribune hosted the opening reception where participants toured Media General’s News Center, the world’s first and largest convergence facility.  Participants visited The Poynter Institute located in St. Petersburg, Florida, an international school dedicated to teaching and inspiring journalists and media leaders.  In 2004, 140 papers were submitted and 80 were presented.

In 2005, the Colloquium was again hosted by the University of Georgia at Athens, and held at the Holiday Inn near the campus.  Papers were presented in the History, Law, Newspaper, Magazine, Open and RTVJ Divisions.  Highlights included a tour of the Peabody Awards space at the Grady College given by Horace Newcomb and a luncheon panel on supplementing faculty salaries through publishing.

The Colloquium returned to the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa in 2006 and was coordinated by Wilson Lowrey.  The opening event was a BBQ dinner reception aboard the “Bama Belle” riverboat and a cruise down the Black Warrior River.  Papers were presented in the History, Law, Newspaper, Magazine, Open and RTVJ Divisions at the Four Points Sheraton. Kenny Irby, the Poynter Institute’s visual journalism expert, was the keynote speaker and gave a presentation on news photos from Hurricane Katrina coverage. Participants were offered a tour of The College of Communication and Information Sciences in Reese-Phifer Hall, including the commercial station WVUA-TV, the Center for Public Television and Radio, the Institute for Communication and Information Research facilities and campus media.  Several attendees continued on a tour of some of the historic points of interest on the Alabama campus.  At the business meeting, the participants voted in favor of two important changes to the colloquium.  First, the paper submission deadline was changed to be a POSTMARK deadline of the second Monday in December each year to give enough time for graduate student papers that were completed during Fall semester courses to be revised and submitted. Second, because of the large number of papers left at the end of the conference, the participants voted that paper presenters would be required to bring only 10 copies of their papers to the conference, rather than the previously required 25 copies.

Tulane University hosted the Colloquium in New Orleans in 2007.  The opening event was a reception sponsored by the University of Mississippi and Tulane University in the Sculpture Garden at the Renaissance Arts Hotel.  There were 93 papers presented in the five divisions.  The acceptance rates of each division was as follows:  Newspaper – 53%, History – 67%, Open – 56%, Magazine – 64%, Law – 64% and RTVJ – 40%.  The keynote speaker was James O’Byrne, Features Editor at the Times-Picayune who spoke on “Why Newspapers Matter: Discovering the Power of Print in the Wake of Disaster.” On Saturday, the closing lunch featured a panel speaking on “The Leadership Paradox: Serving the academic community without sacrificing soul or career.” Panel members were Frederick R. Blevens, Associate Dean & Professor, Florida International University and President, American Journalism Historian’s Association; Charles Self, Gaylord Chair and Professor, The University of Oklahoma and President-elect, AEJMC; Dana Rosengard, McMahon Centennial Professor, The University of Oklahoma; and Kathleen Wickham, Associate Professor, University of Mississippi and Newspaper Division Chair, AEJMC.  At the business meeting, participants discussed the decision at the previous year’s meeting to change the submission deadline to a POSTMARK deadline on the second Monday in December each year to give enough time for graduate student papers that were completed during Fall semester courses to be revised and submitted.  Since many university post offices close during the semester break, some papers did not get to paper chairs until mid-January making it difficult to get them judged.  The late papers were postmarked by the proper date, however, they had been sent 4th class.  The Colloquium members voted unanimously to keep the postmark date the same, but to require First Class or Priority Mail postage.  Other matters discussed at the business meeting included: the dates and locations of the Colloquium for the next three years, volunteers for paper chairs for next year’s colloquium, and Dave Davies at USM volunteered to host a permanent Southeast Colloquium Website.

Auburn University hosted the Colloquium in 2008 under the direction of John Carvalho. The opening event was a cocktail reception sponsored by the Auburn University Department of Communication and Journalism. Freedom of Information in Practice was the focus of the lunch Friday while on Saturday a luncheon panel focused on magazine ethics.

Sites & Hosts

1.            1976 – University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
2.            1977 – University of Tennessee, Knoxville
3.            1978 – University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
4.            1979 – University of South Carolina, Charleston
5.            1980 – University of Georgia, Georgia State and Georgia Southern – Atlanta
6.            1981 – Memphis State University, Memphis
7.            1982 – University of Florida, Gainesville
8.            1983 – Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge
9.            1984 – Hampton Institute, Hampton, Virginia
10.          1985 – University of Georgia, Athens
11.          1986 – University of Tennessee, Knoxville
12.          1987 – Virginia Tech University, Blacksburg
13.          1988 – University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
14.          1989 – University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
15.          1990 – University of South Carolina, Charleston
16.          1991 – University of Central Florida, Orlando
17.          1992 – University of Georgia and Georgia State University, Stone Mountain
18.          1993 – University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
19.          1994 – University of South Carolina, Charleston
20.          1995 – University of Florida, Gainesville
21.          1996 – Virginia Tech University, Washington & Lee University, Roanoke
22.          1997 – University of Tennessee, Knoxville
23.          1998 – Southeastern Louisiana Univ. and Louisiana Consortium, New Orleans
24.          1999 – University of Kentucky, Lexington
25.          2000 – University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
26.          2001 – University of South Carolina, Columbia
27.          2002 – University of Southern Mississippi, Gulfport
28.          2003 – University of Arkansas, Little Rock
29.          2004 – University of South Florida, Tampa
30.          2005 – University of Georgia, Athens
31.          2006 – University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
32.          2007 – Tulane University
33.          2008 – Auburn University
34.          2009 – University of Mississippi, Oxford
35.          2010 – University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Responses

  1. History of the Southeast Colloquium

    In 1976, a small group of journalism historians, primarily from the southeastern United States, decided to gather in Chapel Hill, N.C., to do the sorts of things academicians usually do when they meet — talk about their research, share teaching tips, debate and discuss issues and ideas, and, most likely, commiserate over low salaries, heavy teaching loads and insufficient time for writing and research.

    Thus was born the Southeast Regional Colloquium. The oldest and most successful regional journalism and mass communication meeting, the Southeast Colloquium has given hundreds of graduate students their first crack at presenting their scholarly research at an academic conference. It has allowed scores of professors and students to try out ideas and theories, many of which ultimately blossomed into articles, monographs and even books. It has provided teachers a much-needed break from the daily routine of lectures, labs and paper grading, coupled with the opportunity to hear thought-provoking speakers and stimulating panel discussions. But perhaps most importantly, it has given journalism and mass communication scholars the chance to meet and interact with colleagues from other schools in an informal, collegial atmosphere, the chance to form not only professional relationships but also lasting friendships.

    When members of the History Division agreed to hold the first colloquium at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill in 1976, AEJMC was just AEJ. Although the association’s name was used in conjunction with the gathering, the colloquium was a grassroots activity, planned, organized and carried out by the scholars themselves rather than by AEJ officers or staff. The organizers decided the term “colloquium,” rather than “convention” or “conference,” best described the nature of the gathering.

    The colloquium’s present format was established early on. A host school plans and coordinates the event with participants charged a registration fee low enough to enable graduate students to afford to attend but high enough to enable the host school to cover all, or most, of the expenses.

    Participants in the first colloquium enjoyed the experience so much that they decided to do it again the following year. The second colloquium, still primarily a gathering of History Division members, was held in 1977 at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville.

    History, newspaper and law gathered at the Atlanta Biltmore Hotel in 1980 for a colloquium coordinated jointly by Harold Davis of Georgia State, Wallace Eberhard of the University of Georgia and Sam Riley of Georgia Southern. Colleagues outside the Southeast were invited to submit papers, establishing the open-to-all policy still followed today. Five students and 11 faculty members presented papers, and The Newspaper Fund conducted a workshop of “Teaching Reporting of the Courts.”

    The Sheraton in Memphis, Tennessee, was the site of the 1981 colloquium, with Gerald Stone of Memphis State as coordinator. A highlight of the sixth Southeast Colloquium was Joseph Costa’s talk on his camera coverage of the Bruno Hauptmann trial for the kidnapping and murder of the Lindbergh baby. Conferees also attended Memphis’s famed Blues Alley and sampled some memorable barbequed ribs.

    In 1982, the colloquium moved to the Holiday Inn in Gainesville, Florida, with Jon Rosenraad and Jean Chance of the University of Florida coordinating arrangements. Participation continued to increase, with 18 faculty and five student paper presentations. The keynote speaker was Roy Peter Clark of the Modern Media Institute.

    Whitney Mundt of Louisiana State University hosted the 1983 meeting at the Prince Murat Hotel in Baton Rouge. One highlight was Louisiana Governor Edwin Edwards’s participation in a panel discussion on law and ethics. A Louisiana crawfish jamboree dinner gave local flavor to the proceedings.

    In 1984, AEJ became AEJMC, and George Cullen of the Hampton Institute hosted the Southeast Colloquium at the Holiday Inn in Hampton, Virginia. Two highlights of the event were Attorney Conrad Shumadine’s keynote address on gaining access to information and crab from the Chesapeake Bay.

    The 10th annual Southeast Colloquium was hosted by Wallace Eberhard of the University of Georgia and held at the Athens Holiday Inn. Panels included “Success in Publishing”, “Research Sources in Media History” and “The Professor and the PC.” At this meeting, some attendees gathered to discuss forming a separate undergraduate student-oriented version of the Southeast Colloquium, which eventually became known as the Southeast Journalism Conference.

    Mike Singletary of the University of Tennessee coordinated the 1986 meeting at the Knoxville Hilton, where 32 faculty and four student papers were presented. Colloquium attendees were treated to authentic mountain music and a Southern barbeque dinner at the Museum of Appalachia.

    The Marriott in Blacksburg, Virginia, was the site of the 1987 colloquium with Sam Riley of Virginia Tech acting as host. Twenty-one faculty papers, eight student papers and two panels formed the core of the program. A trip to Mountain Lake Hotel for dinner was one of the social events.

    In 1988, the Southeast Colloquium moved back to the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa, where participants stayed at the Sheraton Capstone Inn. David Sloan and Jim Stoval hosted the conference. A 12-page packet containing the abstracts of the 28 papers presented at the meeting was given to each registrant.

    The following year, the colloquium returned home, and Raleigh Mann of the University of North Carolina coordinated arrangements. Participants stayed at the historic Carolina Inn adjacent to the Chapel Hill campus. The Law Division presented a panel on lawyers in the newsroom. A Carolina pig-pickin’ was the culinary treat, with entertainment by Mann’s own barbershop quartet.
    In 1990, Perry Ashley and South Carolina welcomed attendees back to Charleston. Hurricane Hugo, which had blown through Charleston in 1987, provided the topic for a panel on disaster coverage. Public officials critiqued media coverage of the hurricane’s aftermath, and attendees walked through downtown Charleston to examine damage to the historic district.

    Fred Felder of the University of Central Florida hosted the next colloquium at Orlando’s Harley Hotel. Fedler arranged a panel of three Pulitzer Prize winners: Dave Barry of the Miami Herald, Lucy Morgan of the St. Petersburg Times and Jan Healy of the Orlando Sentinel.

    In 1992, the colloquium moved to Stone Mountain, Georgia, a resort near Atlanta, where Wallace Eberhard of the University of Georgia and Greg Lisby of Georgia State University coordinated arrangements. This was the first year that paper submissions and attendance both topped 100, with 106 papers submitted and 100 people attending. As further evidence of the colloquium’s maturity, Eberhard and Lisby published the proceedings of the meeting, including the full text of the top five papers and abstracts of 23 others. The publication was a first for the colloquium and continues today. Lisby served as editor of the proceedings until Ginger Carter of Georgia College took over in 1997.

    The University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa hosted the 1993 Southeast Regional Colloquium when Sloan and Stovall again served as coordinators. In 1994 it was back to Charleston for another colloquium hosted by the University of South Carolina College of Journalism and Mass Communications. A record 143 papers were submitted, and 97 were accepted for presentation at the 1994 meeting. USC Associate Dean Pat McNeely, colloquium coordinator, treated conferees to an assortment of Charleston cuisine and walking tours of the harbor.

    The colloquium returned to the University of Florida in 1995 to celebrate its 20th birthday. Participants visited the new wing of Weimer Hall to see Sun.ONEonline information service and other telecommunications activities. In addition to a plenary session and panel discussions on the media and the criminal justice system and coverage of high-profile trials, more than 80 research papers were presented. Sandra Chance coordinated the 20th annual program, and more than 60 faculty and students registered.

    Virginia Tech and Washington and Lee joined forces to host the 1996 Southeast Colloquium at Virginia Tech’s newly refurbished Hotel Roanoke and Conference Center. The annual Washington and Lee Ethics Institute took place at the same time, providing expanded programming. Wat Hopkins, Sam Riley and Ken Rystrom of Virginia Tech, and Ham Smith and Brian Richardson of Washington & Lee organized guest speakers and panel discussions on media ethics.

    The 1997 colloquium returned to the University of Tennessee in Knoxville with Dorothy Bowles as coordinator. For the first time in 19 years, the colloquium expanded to include other divisions. Members of AEJMC’s Communication Theory and Methodology and Magazine Divisions joined History, Law and Newspaper. The Magazine Division held its annual midyear meeting in conjunction with the colloquium. Another innovation was the creation of an “open division” paper competition. A total of 168 papers were submitted to the six separate paper competitions, and 122 were accepted for presentation. Jane Kirtley, executive director of The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, was the keynote speaker.

    The 1998 colloquium was held at the Best Western Landmark Hotel in Metairie, Louisiana, outside New Orleans. Once again the Magazine Division joined History, Law and Newspaper, but neither the CT&M nor Open divisions operated in the 1998 colloquium. A consortium of 11 Louisiana schools hosted the colloquium and Joe Mirando of Southeastern Louisiana University served as coordinator. A total of 143 papers were submitted, and the four divisions accepted 98. Special session speakers addressed accreditation, restrictions on interviewing jurors and coverage of the TWA Flight 800 crash. At the business meeting, colloquium participants voted to officials add the Magazine Division to the roster of permanent Southeast Colloquium sponsors.

    Lexington, Kentucky, was the site of the 1999 Colloquium when Roy Moore of the University of Kentucky acted as coordinator. Eastern Kentucky University, Northern Kentucky University and Murray State joined UK as hosts. The Open Division paper competition was reinstated, and a total of 118 research papers were presented. First Amendment attorney Bruce Sanford gave a keynote address on “Shooting the Messenger: The Evaporation of First Amendment Protections for the Media,” and a panel of journalists, judges and lawyers discussed issues related to whether journalists have the right to disobey court orders they believe are unconstitutional.

    In 2000, the Colloquium returned to its roots at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill where the organization was founded in 1975. Peggy Blanchard coordinated the 25th annual Southeast Colloquium and Mary Alice Shaver and Ruth Walden rounded out the steering committee. The Colloquium included Media Ethics and continued the Open Division, which was started at Kentucky in 1999. Nearly 10 presentations were made on topics ranging from the changing definition of malice to reporters’ uses of Internet “cookies” for research and the continuing impact of media mergers on newsgathering. The colloquium was a double celebration as participants toured Carroll Hall, North Carolina’s new state-of-the-art facility, which Dean Richard Cole said represented one of the most important developments in the school’s 75-year history.

    The University of South Carolina and the state capital, Columbia, again played host to the Colloquium in 2001. Patricia McNeeley coordinated the presentation of more than 100 papers in five divisions: History, Law, Magazine, Newspaper and Open. Highlights of the meeting included a distinguished panel on South Carolina “Journalists as Educators” held at USC’s impressive Carolinian Library; a panel on “Preparing the Next Generation of Journalists,” featuring an internal panel of prominent journalists and publishing executives from a half-dozen countries; a guided tour of South Carolina’s historic State House; and a well attended “open house” reception hosted by AEJMC at its nearby association headquarters office.
    The Colloquium moved to Gulfport, Mississippi, on the Gulf Coast in 2002, where David Davies and the University of Southern Mississippi hosted. The program kicked off with an outside reception on the beautiful Oasis Veranda of the Grand Oasis Hotel. A plenary panel featured veteran journalists, all members of the Mississippi Press Association Hall of Fame, who recalled coverage of the civil rights movement, and that panel was followed by a lunchtime address by the Sun Herald’s executive editor. Colloquium participants presented 85 papers in the History, Law, Magazine, Newspaper and Open divisions.

    In 2003, Rick Peltz and the Schools of Law and Mass Communication at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock Arkansas hosted the 28th annual conference. The program included an address by Skip Rutherford, President, of the William J. Clinton Presidential Foundation and a tour of the Clinton Presidential Library.

    Tampa, Florida, was the site of the 2004 Colloquium and Marie Curkan-Flanagan of the University of South Florida acted as coordinator. Faculty and staff in the School of Mass Communications were the hosts. For the first time in its 29-year history the Southeast Colloquium included the RTVJ Division of the AEJMC. At the business meeting, colloquium participants voted to officially add RTVJ to the permanent roster of Southeast Colloquium Divisions. Gil Thelen, publisher of the Tampa Tribune delivered the keynote address and the Tampa Tribune hosted the opening reception where participants toured Media General’s News Center, the world’s first and largest convergence facility. Participants visited The Poynter Institute located in St. Petersburg, Florida, an international school dedicated to teaching and inspiring journalists and media leaders. In 2004, 140 papers were submitted and 80 were presented.

    In 2005, the Colloquium was again hosted by the University of Georgia at Athens, and held at the Holiday Inn near the campus. Papers were presented in the History, Law, Newspaper, Magazine, Open and RTVJ Divisions. Highlights included a tour of the Peabody Awards space at the Grady College given by Horace Newcomb and a luncheon panel on supplementing faculty salaries through publishing.

    The Colloquium returned to the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa in 2006 and was coordinated by Wilson Lowrey. The opening event was a BBQ dinner reception aboard the “Bama Belle” riverboat and a cruise down the Black Warrior River. Papers were presented in the History, Law, Newspaper, Magazine, Open and RTVJ Divisions at the Four Points Sheraton. Kenny Irby, the Poynter Institute’s visual journalism expert, was the keynote speaker and gave a presentation on news photos from Hurricane Katrina coverage. Participants were offered a tour of The College of Communication and Information Sciences in Reese-Phifer Hall, including the commercial station WVUA-TV, the Center for Public Television and Radio, the Institute for Communication and Information Research facilities and campus media. Several attendees continued on a tour of some of the historic points of interest on the Alabama campus. At the business meeting, the participants voted in favor of two important changes to the colloquium. First, the paper submission deadline was changed to be a POSTMARK deadline of the second Monday in December each year to give enough time for graduate student papers that were completed during Fall semester courses to be revised and submitted. Second, because of the large number of papers left at the end of the conference, the participants voted that paper presenters would be required to bring only 10 copies of their papers to the conference, rather than the previously required 25 copies.

    Tulane University hosted the Colloquium in New Orleans in 2007. The opening event was a reception sponsored by the University of Mississippi and Tulane University in the Sculpture Garden at the Renaissance Arts Hotel. There were 93 papers presented in the five divisions. The acceptance rates of each division was as follows: Newspaper – 53%, History – 67%, Open – 56%, Magazine – 64%, Law – 64% and RTVJ – 40%. The keynote speaker was James O’Byrne, Features Editor at the Times-Picayune who spoke on “Why Newspapers Matter: Discovering the Power of Print in the Wake of Disaster.” On Saturday, the closing lunch featured a panel speaking on “The Leadership Paradox: Serving the academic community without sacrificing soul or career.” Panel members were Frederick R. Blevens, Associate Dean & Professor, Florida International University and President, American Journalism Historian’s Association; Charles Self, Gaylord Chair and Professor, The University of Oklahoma and President-elect, AEJMC; Dana Rosengard, McMahon Centennial Professor, The University of Oklahoma; and Kathleen Wickham, Associate Professor, University of Mississippi and Newspaper Division Chair, AEJMC. At the business meeting, participants discussed the decision at the previous year’s meeting to change the submission deadline to a POSTMARK deadline on the second Monday in December each year to give enough time for graduate student papers that were completed during Fall semester courses to be revised and submitted. Since many university post offices close during the semester break, some papers did not get to paper chairs until mid-January making it difficult to get them judged. The late papers were postmarked by the proper date, however, they had been sent 4th class. The Colloquium members voted unanimously to keep the postmark date the same, but to require First Class or Priority Mail postage. Other matters discussed at the business meeting included: the dates and locations of the Colloquium for the next three years, volunteers for paper chairs for next year’s colloquium, and Dave Davies at USM volunteered to host a permanent Southeast Colloquium Website.

    Auburn University hosted the Colloquium in 2008 under the direction of John Carvalho. The opening event was a cocktail reception sponsored by the Auburn University Department of Communication and Journalism. Freedom of Information in Practice was the focus of the lunch Friday while on Saturday a luncheon panel focused on magazine ethics.

    Sites & Hosts

    1. 1976 – University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
    2. 1977 – University of Tennessee, Knoxville
    3. 1978 – University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
    4. 1979 – University of South Carolina, Charleston
    5. 1980 – University of Georgia, Georgia State and Georgia Southern – Atlanta
    6. 1981 – Memphis State University, Memphis
    7. 1982 – University of Florida, Gainesville
    8. 1983 – Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge
    9. 1984 – Hampton Institute, Hampton, Virginia
    10. 1985 – University of Georgia, Athens
    11. 1986 – University of Tennessee, Knoxville
    12. 1987 – Virginia Tech University, Blacksburg
    13. 1988 – University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
    14. 1989 – University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
    15. 1990 – University of South Carolina, Charleston
    16. 1991 – University of Central Florida, Orlando
    17. 1992 – University of Georgia and Georgia State University, Stone Mountain
    18. 1993 – University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
    19. 1994 – University of South Carolina, Charleston
    20. 1995 – University of Florida, Gainesville
    21. 1996 – Virginia Tech University, Washington & Lee University, Roanoke
    22. 1997 – University of Tennessee, Knoxville
    23. 1998 – Southeastern Louisiana Univ. and Louisiana Consortium, New Orleans
    24. 1999 – University of Kentucky, Lexington
    25. 2000 – University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
    26. 2001 – University of South Carolina, Columbia
    27. 2002 – University of Southern Mississippi, Gulfport
    28. 2003 – University of Arkansas, Little Rock
    29. 2004 – University of South Florida, Tampa
    30. 2005 – University of Georgia, Athens
    31. 2006 – University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
    32. 2007 – Tulane University
    33. 2008 – Auburn University
    34. 2009 – University of Mississippi, Oxford
    35. 2010 – University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill


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